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Reintroduction of game animals in New Brunswick


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#1 looniebeaver

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Posted 27 April 2012 - 04:41 PM

I am new to NB and was wondering if any conservation groups have ever considered reintroducing once common but extirpiated animals back into NB.I know southern Ontario has had an amazing turkey hunt the last 20 years and last year held the first elk hunt in eastern Ontario in many years due to reintroduction.To see the same thing done to the once common New Brunswick caribou would be an amazing achievment.
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#2 TheCoachZed

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Posted 27 April 2012 - 05:24 PM

I think it's been tried, and failedm for two reasons.

One, whitetails carry a disease that's fatal to caribou. That's likely why they survived in NFLD, but not here.

Two, supposedly, they don't have the free-ranging capability they'd need, due to population/deforestation/development. Not sure I buy that one.

It really is too bad. I'd love to see the re-introduction of a woodland caribou herd, and I'm sure some brainy veterinary scientist types could figure out how to do it ... but it would take a lot of money, and nobody wants it that bad.
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#3 Bowtech

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Posted 27 April 2012 - 06:23 PM

Parelaphostrongylus tenuis or brainworm, whitetail deer are the typical host and are unaffected by it but lethal to moose and caribou.
One of the reasons you don't find many moose where you have high concentrations of deer.
If I remember right they did bring some bou's into maine and they all died from brainworm. The last one was put in captivity until it's death I think.

I think with the influx of coyotes, high bear population, changing landscape and with that a reduction in type and amount of food sources along with an increase of whitetails (ie) brainworm it would be a near impossible task.
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#4 Bull's eye

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Posted 27 April 2012 - 10:34 PM

Re-introduction or outright introduction of a new species in a certain geographical area can have positive and negative impacts. For example, wild turkey in New-Brunswick, albeit accidental or voluntary, could reduce substantially the domestic ruffed grouse and spruce grouse, as the turkeys litteraly eat everything that falls under their talons. This is a negative impact. Increased hunting opportunities, especially in the Spring time for Gobblers, would certainly be a positive impact for a lot of hunters.

Ontario has had an incredible success with the intro of wild turkeys, but their grouse population has suffered a lot from what I've read.
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#5 whaler

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Posted 28 April 2012 - 07:56 AM

Re-introduction or outright introduction of a new species in a certain geographical area can have positive and negative impacts. For example, wild turkey in New-Brunswick, albeit accidental or voluntary, could reduce substantially the domestic ruffed grouse and spruce grouse, as the turkeys litteraly eat everything that falls under their talons. This is a negative impact. Increased hunting opportunities, especially in the Spring time for Gobblers, would certainly be a positive impact for a lot of hunters.

Ontario has had an incredible success with the intro of wild turkeys, but their grouse population has suffered a lot from what I've read.


Your information on Wild Turkey introduction is not true, and not even close.
There would be very little if any negative impact. This is proven fact with many studies done.
I really find it very disturbing that people make these statements which are just a guess with no background?
We are in the process of getting a re-introduction of the Wild Turkey back into Newbrunswick. We have been working very hard and jumping through all the hoops.
In Ontario, it was also a re-introduction not an introduction. Big difference.
There is no negative impact on grouse. Fact with studies! As a matter of fact the NWTF and the Grouse scotiety partner on many projects.
Turkeys don't eat everything under their talons.....actually they don't have talons! They have feet!
If any of you want to do some research, I would be happy to direct you?
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#6 T-Rex

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Posted 28 April 2012 - 08:19 AM

devil's advocate here....is there any other good reason to (re) introduce turkeys into NB other than to hunt them? I guess I am concerned with giving the coyotes more to eat thus increasing their population and having a further effect on the deer heard.
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#7 whaler

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Posted 28 April 2012 - 08:41 AM

Well.......for one they were here before and they are returning natuarly.
In Maine right now, the turkey season generates over $30 million dollars to the economy. Creats employment.
NB outfitters have a disadvantage as their counterparts in Maine have the advantage. Turkey hunting in the morning and bear hunting in the afternoon. Where would you go hunting??? We could have the same.
Coyotes will get some, but Turkeys roost in trees. They have a difficult time getting turkeys. The only time they may get turkeys is when they are on the nest or just after the poults hatch. Poults will fly when they are 2 weeks old.
The introduction would cost nothing to the tax payers of Newbrunswick. Completely funded by the National Wild Turkey Federation.
I ask you.......why not?
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#8 abuckisabuck

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Posted 28 April 2012 - 08:52 AM

Well, whaler you took the words right out of my mouth. They're coming wether we help them or not; wether we hunt them or not. Question is are we spectators or participants. For once, we could do something that increases diversity and wildlife health in general. I'm not a big fan of 'Federations' and we all know why but so far, these guys are delivering so lets give them a little push.
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#9 wonksy

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Posted 28 April 2012 - 09:13 PM

There is no negative impact on grouse. Fact with studies!
If any of you want to do some research, I would be happy to direct you?

Whaler could you show me where it states this, I'm curious pal...Thx!
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#10 T-Rex

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Posted 29 April 2012 - 07:42 AM

This has got to be stopped! Do you guys realize how much I am going to have to beg and plead for money for new gear and the time to go hunt these buggers! The wife is not gonna be happy with you guys and I will for sure tell her who's fault it is! LOL GIDDY UP!
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#11 whaler

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Posted 29 April 2012 - 07:49 AM

www.ent-fundy.ca Go to the document library, then to Wild Turkey report. Grab a nice chair.....lot to read.
www.nwtf.org this is the National wild turkey federation site. lot here too.
I have many more sources but this all should keep you reading for a few weeks?
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#12 daveyn

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Posted 29 April 2012 - 09:51 AM

I read the reports and while I'm an advocate of wild turkey in New Brunswick I also believe we need good research before we do anything with change. The nwtf report has to be discounted a little because it has to be self serving or wouldn't be on on the nwtf website. The enterprise fundy report is very specific around economic impacts because thats their mandate. In your comments above you spend a great deal of time on economic impacts also and its pretty clear there would be some strong economic benefits as evidenced by the data.
However,in fact, the enterfprise report states for a number of jurisdictions that there is no study or data related to environmental impacts, in the two other jurisdictions it bases its conclusion only on reports of nuisance wildlife and there is no formal study or data on environmental impact outside of a registry of complaints. Not really what I'd call science.
So again, while I'd wholeheartedly support the RE-introduction of Turkeys to the province and believe the impact would be negligible, there is no information in those two reports that has anything specific to say about the impact on grouse or other wildlife, no data, no reports cited, no science.
I'd like to see a huntable turkey population in my lifetime, I think it would be a terrific thing.
Maybe if the coyotes get a taste for turkey they'll leave the deer, bunnies and grouse alone,, here's hopin...
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#13 wonksy

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Posted 29 April 2012 - 10:03 AM

Maybe if the coyotes get a taste for turkey they'll leave the deer, bunnies and grouse alone,, here's hopin...

Dave Ol'boy, what would you rather have? A Mcdonalds Happy Meal or a Chinese Buffet... :lol: :P ;)
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#14 looniebeaver

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Posted 29 April 2012 - 10:31 AM

I can tell you this much for sure,20 30 years ago used to be good grouse hunting the area of southern ontario I hunted.The last 5 years hunting there I never even saw one grouse,so?the trade off...bad for grouse hunters?good for turkey hunters?
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#15 Bowtech

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Posted 29 April 2012 - 12:54 PM

I can tell you this much for sure,20 30 years ago used to be good grouse hunting the area of southern ontario I hunted.The last 5 years hunting there I never even saw one grouse,so?the trade off...bad for grouse hunters?good for turkey hunters?


You might want to consider other reasons for lack of grouse. Grouse needs for habitat differ than those of turkey for the most part. Grouse need high density type habitat created by logging, turkey prefer farmland and open hardwood. Yes they overlap when it comes to abandoned farmsteads, etc. so it is a generalization to be sure but that's the gist. There could be a number of reasons for the lack of grouse but more likely due to habitat change than turkey's.
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Bowtech Genesis 27:3 - Now then, get your weapons, your quiver and bow, and go out to the open country to hunt some wild game for me.

#16 Bill Gass

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Posted 29 April 2012 - 05:48 PM

Gents, here is a letter that Mr John Lockerbie, CEO of Ruffed Grouse Society sent to Enterprise Fundy in support of NWTF's initiative to bring wild turkeys to NB.

Bill G.










The Ruffed Grouse Society of Canada

La Societe Canadienne De la Gelinotte Huppee



February 20, 2012

Enterprise Fundy
P.O. Box 5064
29 Milk Board Road
Sussex, NB
E4E 5L2
Attn: Mr. Frank Tenhave

Dear Sir:

On behalf of the Ruffed Grouse Society, I wish to take this opportunity to comment on the Possibility of the release/enhancement of wild turkeys in New Brunswick.

After consulting with our biologists who assured me that wild turkeys would have no detrimental effect on ruffed grouse or American woodcock populations, we will support the efforts of the National Wild Turkey Federation in New Brunswick to enhance the existing population.

The Ruffed Grouse Society has 902 members in this province with 17 Chapters throughout Eastern and Central Canada. In fact, in past years, we have shared habitat projects in Ontario and would welcome an opportunity to work with NWTF in the future.



Yours in Conservation,


The Ruffed Grouse Society
John Lockerbie
CEO Canadian Operations
133 Burpee Street,
Fredericton, NB
E3A 1M6
506-451-8996
jlrgs@nbnet.nb.ca






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#17 Turkeyhunter

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Posted 29 April 2012 - 09:29 PM

Wild turkeys are in every province in Canada except NS, PEI and NF (accept pen released turkeys). There is wild turkeys in 49 states. NWTF trained 100,000 youth in shooting sports last year alone. Its time for our kids, youth, woman in the outdoors, wheeling sportsmen and habitat restoration programs for all wildlife in Atlantic Canada, so we all can benifit for decades to come. There's strength in numbers check out just how many members are in NWTF and the millions of dollars they have spent in the last 30 years. NWTF just held 2 hunting hertigate dinners in NS and NB, which there was silient and live auctions, raffles, games and door prizes, and wild turkey hunts were given away and last night in Truro a Newfoundland moose hunt was raffled off. A couple of lucky people walked away with a hunt of a lifetime, which may not have happened without the support of NWTF and there sponsor outfitters. The outfitter from Maine was so generous that he gave a youth hunt away to one of the volunteers at the Saint John Banquet last Saturday (that kid was some happy). During both events there were numberous hunters heading to Ontario and Maine today to hunt Wild Turkeys, good luck to all Turkey hunters. TH
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#18 whaler

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 08:59 AM

Daveyn

If you look around a bit further, there is lots of science. More than you will ever read.
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#19 Turkeyhunter

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 03:19 PM

check out this link from Maine last week, talking about Wild Turkey Hunting NS and NB.


http://www.pressherald.com/life/outdoors/talking-turkey-in-canada_2012-04-29.html
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#20 Wildchef

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 09:36 PM

Be cool to reintroduce woodland caribou... just cause you fail once doesn't mean it can't be done ;)
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