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#1 chadman

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Posted 21 November 2011 - 02:02 AM

any of the foodplotters out there try planting Chestnut trees? thoughts? Reading in this month's QDMA magazine, they fruit far faster and are more nutritious than oak. Wondering if it's an option for us here in New Brunswick.
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#2 utopiahunter

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Posted 21 November 2011 - 08:44 AM

there's a few horse chestnut tree's in my area..
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#3 Bowtech

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Posted 21 November 2011 - 01:20 PM

Planted 1/2 dozen chinese chestnut this past year. I don't think they utilize the horse chestnut quite as much and they tend to get a blight some years which knocks back nut production, not sure if it is the same blight that affects the american chestnut. I'd like to get some of the chinese/american crosses which are resistant to the american chestnut blight. Might try to order some for next year. The horse chestnut is mildly toxic to people if eaten but deer don't seem to have a problem breaking down the toxin.
Beech is a good native tree but take a LONG time to begin bearing. I've planted a number of hybrid oaks which are another option, they are supposed to produce within 6-8 years. I tried to plant them in small groups away from where I'll be putting my native bur oaks because they cross and dilute or native tree genetics which does concern me now that I've gotten a little more into the trees. I'll be locating native bur oak acorn sources for next year and stick to the native hard mast from here on out. Not so concerned with soft mast species.
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#4 chadman

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Posted 21 November 2011 - 02:45 PM

These are the ones referenced in the article, Dunstan Chestnuts... I'm leaning towards getting some of these.



http://www.realtreen...54451.Item.html

Dunstan Chestnuts are the best and most widely planted chestnut varieties in America - they combine the excellent nut quality and tree form of the American Chestnut with the blight resistance of Chinese Chestnut. There has never been an instance of Dunstan Chestnuts dying from the blight, and they have been grown successfully from Maine and New York, west to Illinois and Wisconsin, and south to east Texas and Florida.

Dunstan Chestnuts are the best tree for deer and wildlife. They produce heavy annual crops (never skipping a year like oaks) of very large, sweet tasting (no tannin) nuts that average 20-35/lb, and can produce 10-20 lbs/tree after 10 years, and as much as 40 lbs/tree at maturity. Trees begin to bear in only 2-4 years. They are easy to grow and thrive in a variety of locations. Plant at least 2 trees for pollination, but production is better with increased quantities planted together.


Height: 60-80'
Spread: 30-40'
Flowers: Showy catkins
Pollination: Need a minimum of 2 trees.
Bloom season: May
Bears: Sep-Oct
Light requirements: Full sun
Soil type: Well-drained pH 5.5-7.0
Pruning: Central leader
Maintenance: Easy
Hardiness Zone: 4-9
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#5 Bowtech

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Posted 21 November 2011 - 03:14 PM

Dunstan would be chinese/american cross blight resistant trees. Let me know if you can find someplace that sells them. There are several places in the states that have them but I don't know if they can ship them to Canada. If so you'll require a phytosanitary permit which I think is $60-80.00. Best if you can find a Canadian nursery that has them.
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Bowtech Genesis 27:3 - Now then, get your weapons, your quiver and bow, and go out to the open country to hunt some wild game for me.

#6 Bowtech

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Posted 21 November 2011 - 03:24 PM

You might also want to consider that the Dunstan variety originally comes from Florida and may not be hardy for NB even though the zone rating is 4. If you can find some nursery in the north they may have some acclimatized to zone 4.
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Bowtech Genesis 27:3 - Now then, get your weapons, your quiver and bow, and go out to the open country to hunt some wild game for me.

#7 chadman

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Posted 21 November 2011 - 04:40 PM

sounds good, I'll do some checking around and post up here what I find out.
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QDM - Plant a seed - make a difference

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#8 Bowtech

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Posted 21 November 2011 - 07:50 PM

Just read the article you`re referring to. Don`t get too taken in by the propaganda, yes chestnuts are a great wildlife mast but they are not a silver bullet. I think it`s important to have a variety of hard mast to offer.

While chestnuts may be a little better nutritionally for deer, similiar to soybeans over corn, white oaks (like corn) are still more preferred and a single mature oak tree can produce more than a chestnut tree (like corn vs soybeans), actually 10-20X the mast of a chestnut tree. Throw in both red and white oaks and you don`t have years with no mast.

I think a combination of chestnut, native american beech (which by the way are more nutritious than both oaks and chestnut combined at 50% fat and 20%protein), and a mix of both native northern red and white oaks is the way to go. Each of them have there pros and cons but together we are getting pretty close to that silver bullet when talking hard mast.
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Bowtech Genesis 27:3 - Now then, get your weapons, your quiver and bow, and go out to the open country to hunt some wild game for me.

#9 chadman

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Posted 21 November 2011 - 08:28 PM

Thanks for the info BT. I was intrigued in the time to fruit for the Dunstan Chestnut vs the other varieties you mention. I agree that a good mix of all would be the best option, but starting out.. the Dunstan I would see fairly quick results. I'll have to map out what i want planted where on the property.. the other thing too I purchased the 58 acre lot adjacent to mine 100 acre lot.. it's been cut about 9 years ago.. it has some high and low spots on it.. that might be the best spot to get a good variety of mast trees planted
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QDM - Plant a seed - make a difference

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#10 Wardo

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Posted 21 November 2011 - 08:29 PM

Is it true that Oak trees can take up to 20 years before they start producing a significant amount of acorns? I've read differing reports about how slow-growing they are, but when compared to Chestnut trees I think there's a considerable difference. Chestnut trees produce quickly, would they be in line with a new Apple Tree? That might be too broad?
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#11 Bowtech

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Posted 21 November 2011 - 09:01 PM

Everyone who wants to sell something always puts the best spin on it. If you are talking native american chestnut then they take as long as any native oak to start producing significant crops, or 20 years. Native american beech have a similiar timeline. Best production for most all native mast trees is between 40-75 years.
It is when you start crossing them with non native species and you get hybridization which causes hybrid vigor that you start seeing time to production decrease. Also the care that they receive when planting makes a huge difference. If you control the vegetation around them and they have the right soil conditions they can or may start producing within those advertised dates. Then again you can decrease the average age of production by several years for native mast trees by giving them the same conditions.
Hybrid oaks are said to start producing within 4 years, hybrid chestnuts within 2, grafted apple trees within 2 years, etc. etc. you get the idea. They may start producing then given the right conditions, lenght of growing season, soil and care but they still need several years after that to reach any kind of good production. Anything less than perfect conditions and you can add several year to those numbers.
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Bowtech Genesis 27:3 - Now then, get your weapons, your quiver and bow, and go out to the open country to hunt some wild game for me.

#12 chadman

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Posted 15 January 2012 - 04:01 PM

Called one of the nurseries in town today, they said they didn't carry it but would call around to see if they could get it sourced.
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#13 Mister November

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Posted 15 January 2012 - 05:35 PM

interesting read guys!
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#14 chadman

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Posted 06 February 2012 - 04:08 PM

I found these which have a similar description as the Dunstan, blight resistant and produces in 3 - 4 years and its a canadian distributor out of Montreal.

http://www.greenbarn...1&ItemID=132959
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QDM - Plant a seed - make a difference

Hoyt Trykon XL @ 70lbs.. 2219 @ 29 in.. Muzzy 4 Blade 125gr = game, death... match!!

#15 Bowtech

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Posted 06 February 2012 - 04:36 PM

If you'r just looking for crosses or chinese chestnut you can also contact Grimo Nut Nursery or Rhoras Nut Farm and Nursery. I see the Green Barn actually lists a Grimo variety but not which one. I have ordered from both of Grimo and Rhora's in the past and have been happy with the product service and price. They are both a lot cheaper than green barn. Just remember that none of the crosses are fully resistant.

http://www.nuttrees.com/index.htm

http://www.grimonut.com/index.php
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Bowtech Genesis 27:3 - Now then, get your weapons, your quiver and bow, and go out to the open country to hunt some wild game for me.

#16 chadman

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Posted 06 February 2012 - 04:41 PM

I was mainly looking at the hybrids or anything that produced fairly quickly. Ya I noticed the pricing at green barn was a bit steep.. perfect I'll check them out, Thanks BT!
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QDM - Plant a seed - make a difference

Hoyt Trykon XL @ 70lbs.. 2219 @ 29 in.. Muzzy 4 Blade 125gr = game, death... match!!




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