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#1 chadman

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Posted 09 September 2011 - 10:54 PM

if a guy wanted to put some oak trees around his foodplot.. what would be the best type of oak for our region and what age class should be bought for transplanting? ie 1yr, 2 yr 3 yr, etc?

i'd prefer something that would be close to acorn production..
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#2 Bowtech

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Posted 12 September 2011 - 10:26 AM

NB only has two native oaks. Northern Red Oak and Bur Oak which is in the white oak group. Deer prefer white oak to red due to lower tannins which make red a little more bitter than white oak. The recommendation though is to plant red oaks to white oaks at a 3:1 ratio. The reason for this is that in any particular year if you have a late frost or whatever and you have no acorn production that year you will have no white acorns since they produce acorns on a yearly basis. Red Oaks take two years to mature so you will always have acorns available if you happen to lose your acorn crop in any particular year.
Saying that Oaks take many years to mature enough to start giving any amount of acorns. You're actually looking at about 25 years for Bur oak to mature before acorn production. I have heard that some can get production in 15 but most sources say 25 and peak production is longer than that. I have been planting native reds and bur oak but to get around the time period since that is a long way off, I have been planting a few places with Hybrid white oaks. They aren't cheap, running at about $10.00/tree if you order 100 minimum plus delivery but some are supposed to start producing within 4-8 years depending on fertility, protection, etc. They should not be planted near your native Bur oaks if you are concerned about maintaining the native oaks as they will cross pollinate with the bur oak, actually a number of the crosses are with Bur oak so it is best to plant them well away from your bur oaks.
You can start oaks yourself or just plant the acorns in the fall as they require a stratification (cold) period. I usually start my own in beds and then outplant them. Some I put tubes on and others I have just planted without protection. Deer like to browse them so it takes a lot to get them going. they will spend the first few years developing their long tap root so don't expect them to take right off but after that they put on quite a bit of growth each year. The reds are faster growing than the bur oaks but still require a few years to develop their tap root.
Right now I think I have several hundred in beds, mostly white oaks. I only get zone hardy oaks which will limit you to Bur Oak, Eastern White Oak, English Oak, Swamp White Oak and maybe one or two others depending on your zone. It depends on which site you look at when it comes to zone hardiness. Some will say that they require zone 5 and others say zone 4 but I'm trying most stuff with zone 5 or less. You can't go wrong with Bur oak or our native Northern Reds as they are zone 3/4 hardy. Make sure you get your seed supply locally or from somewhere with a similiar climate. Bur Oaks are one of the most widely distributed oaks in North America so if you end up purchasing online from the US then they may actually come from somewhere in the south which would not be acclimitized for our area.
By the sounds of it you would like to get some hybids in the ground first. Check out Rhohra's Nut Nursey in Ontario for a Canadian supplier of Hybrids. Price depends on how many you order. Then source some trees here in NB for the Native Burs and Reds and plant them as well for the longer term. That would be my advise anyway. Watch it though, it's almost as addictive (at least for me) as foodplotting :D I think I now have about a dozen or more tree species being propagated in addition to the oaks I've started. I found a 60+ year old Clear Beech tree on our property with 1/2 dozen others around it which I've collected about a 1000 nuts from. I am stratifying them now for planting next spring. I figure to plant them all and then clear out around any that show resistance and do it yearly so someday we'll have a clear stand of beech. I won't be enjoying the fruit of the labor but hopefully someday someone will appreciate the effort! :)
Good Luck
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#3 Track Soup

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Posted 12 September 2011 - 03:44 PM

That is dedication Bowtech! Your kids will never move out... ;)
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#4 Bowtech

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Posted 13 September 2011 - 09:15 AM

That is dedication Bowtech! Your kids will never move out... ;)


:lol: Don't say that, I don't want them living at home forever :lol:
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#5 Old guide

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Posted 13 September 2011 - 08:10 PM

Gees with all that ground and game around I want to move in...:)
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#6 chadman

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Posted 14 September 2011 - 07:05 PM

NB only has two native oaks. Northern Red Oak and Bur Oak which is in the white oak group. Deer prefer white oak to red due to lower tannins which make red a little more bitter than white oak. The recommendation though is to plant red oaks to white oaks at a 3:1 ratio. The reason for this is that in any particular year if you have a late frost or whatever and you have no acorn production that year you will have no white acorns since they produce acorns on a yearly basis. Red Oaks take two years to mature so you will always have acorns available if you happen to lose your acorn crop in any particular year.
Saying that Oaks take many years to mature enough to start giving any amount of acorns. You're actually looking at about 25 years for Bur oak to mature before acorn production. I have heard that some can get production in 15 but most sources say 25 and peak production is longer than that. I have been planting native reds and bur oak but to get around the time period since that is a long way off, I have been planting a few places with Hybrid white oaks. They aren't cheap, running at about $10.00/tree if you order 100 minimum plus delivery but some are supposed to start producing within 4-8 years depending on fertility, protection, etc. They should not be planted near your native Bur oaks if you are concerned about maintaining the native oaks as they will cross pollinate with the bur oak, actually a number of the crosses are with Bur oak so it is best to plant them well away from your bur oaks.
You can start oaks yourself or just plant the acorns in the fall as they require a stratification (cold) period. I usually start my own in beds and then outplant them. Some I put tubes on and others I have just planted without protection. Deer like to browse them so it takes a lot to get them going. they will spend the first few years developing their long tap root so don't expect them to take right off but after that they put on quite a bit of growth each year. The reds are faster growing than the bur oaks but still require a few years to develop their tap root.
Right now I think I have several hundred in beds, mostly white oaks. I only get zone hardy oaks which will limit you to Bur Oak, Eastern White Oak, English Oak, Swamp White Oak and maybe one or two others depending on your zone. It depends on which site you look at when it comes to zone hardiness. Some will say that they require zone 5 and others say zone 4 but I'm trying most stuff with zone 5 or less. You can't go wrong with Bur oak or our native Northern Reds as they are zone 3/4 hardy. Make sure you get your seed supply locally or from somewhere with a similiar climate. Bur Oaks are one of the most widely distributed oaks in North America so if you end up purchasing online from the US then they may actually come from somewhere in the south which would not be acclimitized for our area.
By the sounds of it you would like to get some hybids in the ground first. Check out Rhohra's Nut Nursey in Ontario for a Canadian supplier of Hybrids. Price depends on how many you order. Then source some trees here in NB for the Native Burs and Reds and plant them as well for the longer term. That would be my advise anyway. Watch it though, it's almost as addictive (at least for me) as foodplotting :D I think I now have about a dozen or more tree species being propagated in addition to the oaks I've started. I found a 60+ year old Clear Beech tree on our property with 1/2 dozen others around it which I've collected about a 1000 nuts from. I am stratifying them now for planting next spring. I figure to plant them all and then clear out around any that show resistance and do it yearly so someday we'll have a clear stand of beech. I won't be enjoying the fruit of the labor but hopefully someday someone will appreciate the effort! :)
Good Luck


perfect, thanks for the info Bowtech. I have been looking online and the hybrid burr oaks caught my eye, like you mention 4 to 8 years before acorn production.. I have no oaks around my property and there are very limited oak stands in the area.. I should be good for no cross pollination.
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#7 razher

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Posted 14 September 2011 - 08:18 PM

I have a good stand of Red Oaks on my property and are dropping Acorns now , If you want some come and get em , in the Chipman area.
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#8 chadman

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Posted 14 September 2011 - 08:43 PM

I have a good stand of Red Oaks on my property and are dropping Acorns now , If you want some come and get em , in the Chipman area.


Thanks for the offer, I'll keep that in mind.. I was leaning towards getting the year old seedlings but I could change my mind before I get around to planting them lol
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QDM - Plant a seed - make a difference

Hoyt Trykon XL @ 70lbs.. 2219 @ 29 in.. Muzzy 4 Blade 125gr = game, death... match!!

#9 ThreeD

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Posted 23 September 2011 - 09:10 PM

Have you considered planting a few strategic apple trees in addition to the oaks ? Might give you some production while your waiting for the oaks to mature. Plus, diversity on your woodlot.
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#10 chadman

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Posted 24 September 2011 - 10:15 AM

I have thought of it, but not sure.. I have a lot of bears around here
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#11 Big Bore

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Posted 24 September 2011 - 11:18 AM

I have thought of it, but not sure.. I have a lot of bears around here

You should instead ask your self : are you going to keep the bears or get rid of them?
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#12 chadman

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Posted 25 September 2011 - 02:11 AM

You should instead ask your self : are you going to keep the bears or get rid of them?


i've been trying to get out bear hunting the last few years but just can't seem to make the time for it. I should really make an attempt to get out this fall after bear around the plot area
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Hoyt Trykon XL @ 70lbs.. 2219 @ 29 in.. Muzzy 4 Blade 125gr = game, death... match!!

#13 Big Bore

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Posted 25 September 2011 - 02:09 PM

i've been trying to get out bear hunting the last few years but just can't seem to make the time for it. I should really make an attempt to get out this fall after bear around the plot area

I realise not many guys have the time or maybe the desire to thin them out but from what I saw around home once you start seeing a couple there everywere and it can take a couple hunters a couple years to thin them out . I know everyone has there diferent ideas on this but around here when I am seeing the bears I see nothing else . By the way how is your oats crop doing???
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